Many of Travelers' ancestor companies, such as St. Paul and USF&G, are technically still around today, and still write policies and accept claims in their own names (under the overarching Travelers brand name). As is typical of most insurers in the United States, Travelers never dissolved the various companies it acquired, but simply made them wholly owned subsidiaries and trained its employees to act on behalf of those subsidiaries. This is a common risk management strategy used by U.S. insurance groups. If any one company in the group gets hit with too many claims, the situation can be easily contained to that one company (which is placed in runoff and allowed to run its policies to completion), while the remainder of the group continues to operate normally.
This German town lays claim to not one but two of the world’s greatest opera houses. Most music lovers know about the acoustically perfect Bayreuth Festspielhaus, built in 1876 by composer Richard Wagner as the home for his summer music festival. But the city also contains the grandest Baroque theater in the world, the Margravial Opera House, built between 1744 and 1748 by Princess Wilhelmina of Prussia. Named a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2012, the theater has been closed for repairs for the past six years. It reopens in April 2018 with a performance of Artaserse by the 18th-century German composer Johann Adolph Hasse (tickets go on sale in February). Bayreuth also makes an excellent starting point from which to explore the rest of the region, famous for its hundreds of Bavarian biergartens and vineyards producing internationally renowned Franconian wines. —Christopher Tkaczyk
In 1998, the Travelers Group merged with Citicorp to form Citigroup.[10] However, the synergies between the banking and insurance arms of the company did not work as well as planned, so Citigroup spun off Travelers Property and Casualty into a subsidiary company in 2002,[12] although it kept the red umbrella logo. Three years later, Citigroup sold Travelers Life & Annuity to MetLife.[13] In 2003, Travelers bought renewal rights for Royal & SunAlliance Personal Insurance and Commercial businesses.[14][15]
In addition to more than 100,000 artifacts, including pieces currently stored in the vaults of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, the new museum will sport a Modernist design courtesy of Heneghan Peng Architects. Chosen from more than 1,550 design proposals from architects in 82 countries, the final building will echo both the geography of the plateau on which it rests as well as the Pyramids themselves. When the museum partially opens in 2018, visitors in the immense atrium can soak in the majestic sight of both the Pyramid of Menkaure and the Great Pyramid of Khufu from a floor-to-ceiling glass wall. —Diana Hubbell
A new crop of five-star brands are coming in 2018, including the Zadún, a Ritz-Carlton Reserve, the Four Seasons Los Cabos at Costa Palmas, the Montage Los Cabos, 1 Hotel & Homes, and the first Nobu Hotel in Mexico. Foodies will want to make a reservation at Acre, a restaurant-farm from executive chefs Kevin Luzande and Oscar Torres, who are set to unveil 12 new treehouse guest rooms on site. —Christopher Tkaczyk
Almost all of the Earth's islands are natural and have been formed by tectonic forces or volcanic eruptions. However, artificial (man-made) islands also exist, such as the island in Osaka Bay off the Japanese island of Honshu, on which Kansai International Airport is located. Artificial islands can be built using natural materials (e.g., earth, rock, or sand) or artificial ones (e.g., concrete slabs or recycled waste).[14][15] Sometimes natural islands are artificially enlarged, such as Vasilyevsky Island in the Russian city of St. Petersburg, which had its western shore extended westward by some 0.5 km in the construction of the Passenger Port of St. Petersburg.[16]

Almost all of the Earth's islands are natural and have been formed by tectonic forces or volcanic eruptions. However, artificial (man-made) islands also exist, such as the island in Osaka Bay off the Japanese island of Honshu, on which Kansai International Airport is located. Artificial islands can be built using natural materials (e.g., earth, rock, or sand) or artificial ones (e.g., concrete slabs or recycled waste).[14][15] Sometimes natural islands are artificially enlarged, such as Vasilyevsky Island in the Russian city of St. Petersburg, which had its western shore extended westward by some 0.5 km in the construction of the Passenger Port of St. Petersburg.[16]
During an update for historians, one of them dies from cerebral overload and is taken over by another traveler. The faction then breaks in and kidnaps the historians. A Blackbox is a device used to extract information from an unconscious or dying person and the team uses one to access a critically injured Hall to ascertain the location of historians. Jeff reaches out to his police sergeant to get his job back and is told to get help from a social worker first. Philip is questioned by the faction. Philip is given time with Kyle as a gesture of good will, who states that he sympathizes with the faction's goal, especially since he just saw another historian die during the update. Faction saves a TELL that Kyle provided to gain his support. Jeff reaches out to David to sign his therapy form for him to get his job back. David agrees to help as a social worker with Jeff's addiction, which the traveler doesn't actually have. Hall is able to relay information from when he was tracking his team's historian showing he ran into a faction team and was shot climbing a fence. He reveals that it was Kyle and Luca from his own team that shot him. Hall is able to show the team the location of the historians and the team is dispatched. While with David, Jeff receives a message to meet up at the location for tactical support. Philip is able to escape before being cornered by Kyle and Luca. Maclaren's team shows up just in time to save Philip and kills Luca and Kyle. The team saves all the historians while taking out many of the faction. Hall is told he saved them all and is able to pass away in peace knowing that. Jeff and Carly reconnect. Philip is seen throwing out his yellow pills that historians have to take.
Often overlooked in favor of more-developed, splashier neighbors like Hvar or Brač, Šolta’s under-the-radar nature has proved a boon: The stony islet has become synonymous with pristine nature (pebbly beaches, turquoise waters, lush greenery), medieval villages, winemaking (try the indigenous Dobričić variety), and family-run olive oil purveyors like Olynthia, a fourth-generation producer. After watching the sun set at Maslinica bay, check out the island’s peppering of stylish beach clubs, seaside bars, and open-air restaurants — then drop your bags at the Heritage Hotel Martinis-Marchi, built inside an 18th-century Venetian fort-castle and ideally situated for those who want to explore Šolta’s ancient villages and crystal-clear bays. —Kate Springer
As Canada's token middle child, Edmonton has long gotten short shrift amid its glitzier sisters (we're looking at you, Toronto and Vancouver). But no longer — food and museum news is casting a spotlight on Alberta’s capital city. After stints at Noma in Copenhagen and Manhattan's Daniel, chef Scott Downey returned to his hometown to open the Butternut Tree in September, with a focus on indigenous foods — grilled bannock with wild mushrooms and winged kelp; bison served with Saskatoon berry jus; maple-butter cake with black-currant jam. We're waiting to make our dinner reservations until the new Royal Alberta Museum opens its doors. Designed by Dialog architects on the site of a former Canada Post distribution center, the 419,000-square-foot space will include Ice Age horse fossils and a dig pit for children. To experience Edmonton’s indie side, stay at Crash Hotel, an homage to the Ace, which opened last winter. Its themed Hi-Fi room walls are lined with vintage speakers, and hangover pills are at the ready in the mini-bar. —Kathryn O’Shea-Evans
This year, Buenos Aires becomes a hub for art, sports, and politics: the inaugural Art Basel Cities program, the Youth Olympic Games, and the G20 will all take place in the city, beginning with the multi-year Art Basel initiative. Though the Argentinean capital is already home to an eclectic collection of galleries, Art Basel Cities promises to elevate Buenos Aires’ reputation in the global art scene by offering professional support for local artists, as well as lectures and workshops throughout the year to draw art lovers to the city.
The Faction sets off nuclear blasts that destroy all of the Travelers' archives outside the US. David, left for dead by the Faction in the last surviving archive, is the only person who can disarm the nuclear device. He succeeds but is exposed to lethal radiation. Kat's suspicions about MacLaren, temporarily allayed, surge again and she throws him out – for her the marriage is over as she feels he is no longer the man she first met. Jeff tries to escape from interrogation by 001; he is eventually found having been walled up. Marcy hopes the Director will send a Traveler medical team to save David but no help arrives. In the moment before he dies, David conveys a message from the Director: "Protocol Omega."

In an interview with Exclaim!, Nick Thorburn explained that the overhauled lineup was a product of his desire to try new things. "That's important to me ― to be able to constantly try new things. That's why this record's largely informed by electronic stuff like drum machines, sequencing, and programming, which really scales it back from the last record." [2] Thompson once again left the band prior to the summer 2010 tour, and was again replaced by Aaron Harris.

Flight Montreal - Toronto (YUL - YYZ) C$ 128+ Flight Montreal - Toronto (YUL - YTZ) C$ 212+ Flight Winnipeg - Toronto (YWG - YYZ) C$ 212+ Flight Halifax - Toronto (YHZ - YYZ) C$ 262+ Flight Fredericton - Toronto (YFC - YTZ) C$ 278+ Flight Saint John - Toronto (YSJ - YYZ) C$ 279+ Flight Québec City - Toronto (YQB - YTZ) C$ 288+ Flight Fredericton - Toronto (YFC - YYZ) C$ 306+ Flight Québec City - Toronto (YQB - YYZ) C$ 320+ Flight Moncton - Toronto (YQM - YYZ) C$ 326+ Flight Edmonton - Toronto (YEG - YYZ) C$ 338+ Flight Vancouver - Toronto (YVR - YYZ) C$ 352+ Flight Halifax - Toronto (YHZ - YTZ) C$ 359+ Flight St. John's - Toronto (YYT - YYZ) C$ 359+ Flight Abbotsford - Toronto (YXX - YYZ) C$ 367+
Landlocked Laos might be quieter than Southeast Asian neighbors like Vietnam and Thailand, but 2018 could transform the country into the region’s next hot spot. Wattay International Airport, in the capital of Vientiane, is set to complete a terminal expansion to accommodate more international links next year, but the biggest changes are foot in the UNESCO World Heritage–inscribed town of Luang Prabang, in central Laos. This serene riverside spot lures travelers to its golden Buddhist temples, French-colonial architecture, hiking trails, nearby elephant sanctuaries — and now, glamorous new digs. Last year, the design-forward Azerai opened inside a century-old French-colonial building that was formerly an officer’s quarters. The debut concept from Aman Resorts founder Adrian Zecha has airy, light wood interiors that nod to local culture in their use of batik textiles and Laotian artwork. There’s also an 80-foot swimming pool in a tree-shaded central courtyard. The upcoming Rosewood Luang Prabang aims to be a destination in itself. Opening in mid 2018, this highly anticipated resort will feature pavilion-style villas, luxury tents, and a spa that seems to float above the jungle. —Kate Springer
Although the former Soviet republic might seem remote, Uzbekistan once sat at the very center of the world. In the first millennium, no traveler could pass from Asia to Europe without stopping in the Silk Road strongholds of Bukhara and Samarkand, and as a result these cities evolved into rich cultural centers. For intrepid travelers, today’s Uzbekistan is a promised land: a Muslim-majority nation that’s both safe and affordable, with few tourists and an abundance of well-preserved mosques and harems. And since the death of authoritarian president Islam Karimov last year, the new regime has taken steps toward reform that have given both Uzbeks and the international community reason for optimism. Improving relations with Iran could soon bring a rail link to the Persian Gulf, and in 2016, the Afrosiyob high-speed-train line began connecting the country’s major cities. Meanwhile, Uzbekistan should benefit from the so-called Iron Silk Road, or Trans-Asian Railway — a Chinese-funded network of routes knitting together Beijing and Europe — once a segment connecting the country through Kyrgyzstan is completed. Book a customized journey with Exeter International, which specializes in the region. —Heidi Mitchell
Philip obsesses over the lives the team is forbidden to save, writing the names and time, elevation, latitude, and longitude (TELL) coordinates of all potential candidates on the warehouse wall. He secretly tips off the FBI to prevent killings. He leads the team to rescue abducted child Aleksander Andrieko before his murder, falsely claiming it as a mission from the Director. As a messenger, Aleksander exposes the ruse. MacLaren decides to abandon the "mission", but Philip refuses, drawing his weapon. Aleksander is saved, his captors are killed, and Philip survives a gunshot wound; Marcy reveals his heroin addiction to the others, and plans to wean him. Jeff investigates the assault on Marcy, and detects the personality changes. David covers for her. The team adjusts to the 21st-century's contrast with the scarcity of their native era.
In an interview with Exclaim!, Nick Thorburn explained that the overhauled lineup was a product of his desire to try new things. "That's important to me ― to be able to constantly try new things. That's why this record's largely informed by electronic stuff like drum machines, sequencing, and programming, which really scales it back from the last record." [2] Thompson once again left the band prior to the summer 2010 tour, and was again replaced by Aaron Harris.
Beyond offering a glimpse into ancient history, Jordan is also making a name for itself as a luxury destination. Hilton opened the Dead Sea Resort & Spa in March 2017, making it the first Hilton in the country. Located at the lowest point on earth, some 1,345 feet below sea level, the resort offers beach access, Middle Eastern cuisine, and treatments containing the mineral-rich black mud. —Jess McHugh
Resuming their hosts' lives, the team suffer paranoia and hallucinations of their future pre-Travel lives, side effects of the antitoxin. MacLaren's coworkers hold a surprise party for his 15th anniversary with the FBI. Kat confronts him about lying to Forbes; he seduces her, but she is still certain he is cheating. During their lovemaking, MacLaren hallucinates that Kat is a woman with very short hair, with Carly's number (3465) tattooed on her neck. After Rene attempts to shoplift some clothes with Trevor and another friend, Trevor confronts the two outside, in an alley. During a fight between Trevor and the other guy, Trevor possibly experiences a slippage of time, where his friend is able to connect with a punch. This will later develop into Trevor's diagnosis of temporal aphasia. Their intimacy growing, David reluctantly helps Marcy perform surgery on herself to prevent seizures. Carly rebuffs a representative of Child Protective Services. Trevor reins in his host's delinquency, and he and Renee meditate. Ray takes Philip to a twelve-step meeting for drug addicts and gets him a pet turtle to care for. Trevor and Philip learn the team has a new mission.
The Faction sets off nuclear blasts that destroy all of the Travelers' archives outside the US. David, left for dead by the Faction in the last surviving archive, is the only person who can disarm the nuclear device. He succeeds but is exposed to lethal radiation. Kat's suspicions about MacLaren, temporarily allayed, surge again and she throws him out – for her the marriage is over as she feels he is no longer the man she first met. Jeff tries to escape from interrogation by 001; he is eventually found having been walled up. Marcy hopes the Director will send a Traveler medical team to save David but no help arrives. In the moment before he dies, David conveys a message from the Director: "Protocol Omega."
In a post-apocalyptic future, thousands of special operatives are tasked with preventing the collapse of society. These operatives, known as "travelers", have their consciousnesses sent back in time and transferred into the "host" body of present-day individuals who would otherwise be moments from death, to minimize unexpected impact on the time line. The transfer requires the exact location of the target, made possible by twenty-first century smart phones and GPS providing time, elevation, latitude, and longitude (TELL) coordinates that are archived for use in the future. Trained using social media and public records concerning their hosts, each traveler must maintain the host's pre-existing life as cover for the rest of their lives, while carrying out missions in teams of five. These missions are dictated by the Director in the future who monitors the time line, and are aimed at saving the world from a series of catastrophic events. One method by which the Director communicates with travelers is via pre-pubescent children used as messengers; unlike adults, any child can safely be taken over for a few minutes by the Director and then released from control without risk of killing them. All travelers are required to behave according to certain protocols to protect the time line:
In November 2010, Travelers entered into a joint venture agreement under which the company would invest in J. Malucelli Participações em Seguros e Resseguros S.A., the market leader in the surety insurance business in Brazil. The transaction closed in June 2011 with Travelers acquiring a 43.4 percent interest. Travelers' investment in newly issued shares significantly increased J. Malucelli's capital level, positioning it for substantial growth in Brazil. At the time, Travelers had the option to increase its investment to retain a 49.5 percent interest, which the company later did in 2012.[23]

Return to the Sea was re-mastered in England for the European version of the album, and was released there by Rough Trade Records on April 3, 2006. In North America, the album was released on the upstart label Equator Records on April 4, 2006. The cover of the album is a painting by Caspar David Friedrich titled The Wreck of the Hope. The album features numerous guest appearances, including members of Arcade Fire and Wolf Parade.
Over the past few years, South Korea’s Gangwon Province has shed its sleepy past and come into its own as a prime winter-sports destination — a transformation that will take center stage during the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics (February 9–25). Ahead of the big event, the region will debut a new high-speed rail line that will whisk travelers from Incheon International Airport to the resort town in just 70 minutes, making it easier to access the Taebaek Mountains’ panoramic pistes and tourist-friendly attractions. Powder hounds will want to lodge at the InterContinental Alpensia Pyeongchang Resort, which commands a prime location at the foot of the Alpensia ski slopes, steps from two Olympic-class runs, and is one of a handful of hotels built for the games. Break from all the outdoor action at the Ocean 700 indoor water park, complete with wave pools and tubing rides. —Talia Avakian
On October 25, 2011, ANTI- announced Islands' fourth record, A Sleep & a Forgetting, which was released February 14, 2012. In a statement, Thorburn explained, "I left New York after the end of a relationship and came to Los Angeles. There was a piano where I was staying and that’s where I wrote these songs. This record deals with loss, with memory and forgetting and with dreaming. I started writing it on Valentine’s Day and it’s coming out on Valentine’s Day."[4] Drums on the record were played by Luc Laurent, who officially joined the band in November 2011 after his band Pepper Rabbit broke up. The song "Hallways" from the album was featured in a commercial for Dell and the Microsoft Surface tablet.
The project culminates in September with a week of public arts programming developed by Cecilia Alemani, chief curator of the High Line in New York. Then, in October, 4,000 teen athletes from more than 200 countries will flock to the city for the Youth Olympic Games. The southern Villa Soldati neighborhood has seen significant development in anticipation of the events, with new housing, parks, and sports venues that will breathe life into the area well after the Olympians return home. Should you miss out on the world-class athletes, drown your sorrows in a world-class meal. Tegui, an eight-year-old restaurant in trendy Palermo, was recently named one of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants — the first time an Argentinean spot has made the list in 15 years. —Sorrel Moseley-Williams

Marcy puts herself in a near-death state to recover her lost memories from when she was reset. The memories she receives include those of the original host Marcy, showing that the host's intellectual disability was caused by Vincent/001 testing Simon's incomplete consciousness transfer technology on her. While she is out of commission, Mac and the rest of the team are ordered to provide Hall with backup in protecting the future 53rd President of the United States, who is currently a prepubescent girl.

Located at the tip of the Baja Peninsula, the two small colonial towns of Cabo San Lucas and San José del Cabo have become the hottest vacation destinations in Mexico in recent years. With wide, pristine beaches, lively nightclubs, glam resorts, and a farm-to-table food scene, the oasis of Los Cabos is drawing tourists in record numbers. As a result, the hotel scene is booming, with a clutch of new developments and renovations completed this year along the Tourist Corridor, including the sleek Chileno Bay, an Auberge Resort, and a stunning beachfront Solaz resort.
Flight Oakland - Los Angeles (OAK - LAX) $55+ Flight San Francisco - Los Angeles (SFO - LAX) $91+ Flight San José - Los Angeles (SJC - LAX) $91+ Flight Houston - Los Angeles (HOU - LAX) $106+ Flight Houston - Los Angeles (IAH - LAX) $106+ Flight Dallas - Los Angeles (DFW - LAX) $123+ Flight Chicago - Los Angeles (ORD - LAX) $125+ Flight Seattle - Los Angeles (SEA - LAX) $125+ Flight Portland - Los Angeles (PDX - LAX) $137+ Flight New York - Los Angeles (LGA - LAX) $140+ Flight Orlando - Los Angeles (MCO - LAX) $163+ Flight Minneapolis - Los Angeles (MSP - LAX) $165+ Flight Detroit - Los Angeles (DTW - LAX) $166+ Flight Washington - Los Angeles (BWI - LAX) $173+ Flight Atlanta - Los Angeles (ATL - LAX) $178+ Flight Fort Lauderdale - Los Angeles (FLL - LAX) $178+ Flight Philadelphia - Los Angeles (PHL - LAX) $187+ Flight Newark - Los Angeles (EWR - LAX) $191+ Flight Boston - Los Angeles (BOS - LAX) $197+ Flight Raleigh - Los Angeles (RDU - LAX) $199+ Flight Chicago - Los Angeles (MDW - LAX) $201+ Flight Washington - Los Angeles (DCA - LAX) $204+
From the Northwest Florida’s Emerald Coast to the coral-reefed Keys, the state is filled with an array of activities for all ages and tastes. On a Florida vacation, families can plan several days of theme park fun in the Orlando area, or they can ride horses at a secluded ranch in central Florida, ride bikes along nature trails in north Florida, learn about astronauts and rocket science at the Space Coast or take one of the garden tours in Miami and Fort Lauderdale. 

Although the former Soviet republic might seem remote, Uzbekistan once sat at the very center of the world. In the first millennium, no traveler could pass from Asia to Europe without stopping in the Silk Road strongholds of Bukhara and Samarkand, and as a result these cities evolved into rich cultural centers. For intrepid travelers, today’s Uzbekistan is a promised land: a Muslim-majority nation that’s both safe and affordable, with few tourists and an abundance of well-preserved mosques and harems. And since the death of authoritarian president Islam Karimov last year, the new regime has taken steps toward reform that have given both Uzbeks and the international community reason for optimism. Improving relations with Iran could soon bring a rail link to the Persian Gulf, and in 2016, the Afrosiyob high-speed-train line began connecting the country’s major cities. Meanwhile, Uzbekistan should benefit from the so-called Iron Silk Road, or Trans-Asian Railway — a Chinese-funded network of routes knitting together Beijing and Europe — once a segment connecting the country through Kyrgyzstan is completed. Book a customized journey with Exeter International, which specializes in the region. —Heidi Mitchell
Travelers was founded in 1864 in Hartford. It was founded to provide travel insurance to railroad travelers at a time when travel was far more risky and dangerous than today, hence the name. Along the way it had many industry firsts, including the first automobile policy, the first commercial airline policy, and the first policy for space travel.[9] In 1954 it established the world's first privately owned weather research facility, the Travelers Weather Research Center, the first organization to make weather predictions using probabilities ("20% chance of rain"). By the early 1990s, Travelers was predominantly a general property and casualty insurer that also happened to do some travel insurance on the side, and it quietly exited its original business in 1994. What was left of Travelers' travel insurance business was acquired by three former employees and is now known as Travel Insured International, a Crum and Forster Company.
Landlocked Laos might be quieter than Southeast Asian neighbors like Vietnam and Thailand, but 2018 could transform the country into the region’s next hot spot. Wattay International Airport, in the capital of Vientiane, is set to complete a terminal expansion to accommodate more international links next year, but the biggest changes are foot in the UNESCO World Heritage–inscribed town of Luang Prabang, in central Laos. This serene riverside spot lures travelers to its golden Buddhist temples, French-colonial architecture, hiking trails, nearby elephant sanctuaries — and now, glamorous new digs. Last year, the design-forward Azerai opened inside a century-old French-colonial building that was formerly an officer’s quarters. The debut concept from Aman Resorts founder Adrian Zecha has airy, light wood interiors that nod to local culture in their use of batik textiles and Laotian artwork. There’s also an 80-foot swimming pool in a tree-shaded central courtyard. The upcoming Rosewood Luang Prabang aims to be a destination in itself. Opening in mid 2018, this highly anticipated resort will feature pavilion-style villas, luxury tents, and a spa that seems to float above the jungle. —Kate Springer
U.S. travelers have historically overlooked Mauritius in favor of other Indian Ocean destinations like the Seychelles and Maldives. That could all change, though, now that this remote, idyllic island some 1,200 miles off the African coast has become easier to reach. A flurry of new airline services launched at the end of 2017: KLM began servicing Mauritius from Amsterdam, and British carrier Thomas Cook Airlines introduced biweekly flights in November. Upon arrival, travelers can take in dreamy lagoon views from the newly reopened One&Only Le Saint Géran, fresh off a multimillion-dollar renovation. Every room and suite now has a private terrace or balcony, marble baths with cascade showers, and sophisticated teak, stone, and leather accents. Guests can also look forward to updated dining experiences — like lunch spot La Pointe, which grills fresh-caught seafood over firewood and coconut embers, or open-air restaurant La Terrasse, which offers Mauritian specialties. Unchanged at Le Saint Géran is its aura of exclusivity, thanks to the resort’s unique position on a private peninsula jutting out from the island’s eastern shore. —Melanie Lieberman
When historic rainfall pummeled California last February, the damage to Big Sur was severe. Mudslides cut off access to Highway 1, the region’s only thoroughfare, from the south; then a crack ripped through the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge, blocking the northern end. Almost overnight, this 90-odd-mile stretch of craggy coastline — long beloved for its sense of remoteness — became an island. Nearly a year later, Big Sur is stirring back to life. The bridge has been replaced and a major slide has been cleared. After an elaborate renovation, the 160-acre Ventana Big Sur has reopened as the first Alila property in the U.S. — and is a luxurious rival to Post Ranch. The place is a stunner, whether you’re facing a forested canyon from the pool or enjoying pink and orange sunsets from the terrace. In addition to the plush ocean-view suites, clad in weathered wood, there are now glamping tents nearby that marry rusticity and comfort, with amenities like luxury linens and fire pits. —Jonah Weiner
Couples retreats are common along the coastal areas and several luxury hotels offer “pet packages” for those who choose to bring their pups. Sample local beer at one of the many breweries located throughout the state, many of which offer behind-the-scenes tours, along with dozens and dozens of fine wineries as well. Stay in a cabin where Wi-Fi signals are nil or enjoy a modern urban hotel with dozens of fine restaurants, trendy bars and cultural landmarks within walking distance.
Over the past few years, South Korea’s Gangwon Province has shed its sleepy past and come into its own as a prime winter-sports destination — a transformation that will take center stage during the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics (February 9–25). Ahead of the big event, the region will debut a new high-speed rail line that will whisk travelers from Incheon International Airport to the resort town in just 70 minutes, making it easier to access the Taebaek Mountains’ panoramic pistes and tourist-friendly attractions. Powder hounds will want to lodge at the InterContinental Alpensia Pyeongchang Resort, which commands a prime location at the foot of the Alpensia ski slopes, steps from two Olympic-class runs, and is one of a handful of hotels built for the games. Break from all the outdoor action at the Ocean 700 indoor water park, complete with wave pools and tubing rides. —Talia Avakian

Beyond offering a glimpse into ancient history, Jordan is also making a name for itself as a luxury destination. Hilton opened the Dead Sea Resort & Spa in March 2017, making it the first Hilton in the country. Located at the lowest point on earth, some 1,345 feet below sea level, the resort offers beach access, Middle Eastern cuisine, and treatments containing the mineral-rich black mud. —Jess McHugh
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