The Travelers Companies, Inc., commonly known as Travelers, is an American insurance company. It is the second largest writer of U.S. commercial property casualty insurance and the third largest writer of U.S. personal insurance through independent agents. Travelers is incorporated in Minnesota, with headquarters in New York City and its largest office in Hartford, Connecticut. Travelers also maintains a large office in St. Paul, Minnesota.[1] It has been a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average since June 8, 2009.[3]
Knights Inn – Toronto C$ 89+ Hotel Carlingview Toronto Airport C$ 99+ Travelodge by Wyndham Toronto East C$ 99+ Bond Place Hotel C$ 109+ Crowne Plaza Toronto Airport C$ 112+ Toronto Don Valley Hotel and Suites C$ 119+ Chelsea Hotel, Toronto C$ 129+ Delta Hotels by Marriott Toronto Airport & Conference Centre C$ 131+ Holiday Inn Toronto International Airport C$ 132+ Comfort Hotel Airport North C$ 139+ Best Western Plus Travel Hotel Toronto Airport C$ 139+ Strathcona Hotel C$ 143+ DoubleTree by Hilton Toronto Airport C$ 151+ Sheraton Toronto Airport Hotel & Conference Centre C$ 153+ Delta Hotels by Marriott Toronto East C$ 155+
The team track down Simon (Traveler 0004), a specialist who developed the consciousness transfer technology in the future, who was sent into a host body that developed schizophrenia after arrival. Simon, who set up the Travelers' communications system in the 21st, is haunted by hallucinations of Vincent, who previously convinced an institutionalized Simon that the Director wanted him to next build transfer technology in the 21st.
The first season of Travelers has a score of 100% on Rotten Tomatoes based on nine reviews with an average rating of 8.0/10.[9] Neil Genzlinger, writing for The New York Times, described the first season as "tasty", and "enjoyable science fiction", with "some attention-grabbing flourishes and fine acting".[10] Hanh Nguyen, writing for IndieWire, describes the series as "fun and freaky," finding the series' appeal "in how the core group of five travelers adjust to life in our present," noting the "human nature in the travelers".[11] Lawrence Devoe, of TheaterByte.com, called the series "tautly paced and suspenseful" with "well-developed characters", declaring that "Brad Wright has a real knack for creating futuristic series".[12] Evan Narcisse, reviewing the first five episodes for io9, appreciated the moral dilemmas offered by the series premise and the awkwardness presented by the characters' interactions with their hosts' friends, colleagues, lovers, or caretakers: "This is a superhero show in double disguise, offering up clever explorations of the secret identity concept that touch on the guilt and contortions that come with living a double life."[13] Netflix announced that the series was one of its "most devoured" series in 2017.[14]
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